SmartInversion

SmartInversion

Airborne geometrical band with inversion drive  

As part of its Future Concepts programme, Festo is constantly searching for new or not yet widespread concepts of movement and propulsion. In the form of SmartInversion, the developers have managed to come up with an ultralight flying object, which propels itself by turning itself inside out.

Flying by turning inside-out

This constant, rhythmically pulsating movement is known as inversion and gives the flight model its name. With the intelligent combination of extreme lightweight construction, electric drive units and control and regulation technology, inversion kinematics can be indefinitely maintained to produce motion through the air.

  • Efficient: extremely light design for optimal flight characteristics

    Efficient: extremely light design for optimal flight characteristics

  • Intuitive: simple interactive control of highly complex processes

    Intuitive: simple interactive control of highly complex processes

  • Inspiring: the geometrical band after Paul Schatz

    Inspiring: the geometrical band after Paul Schatz

  • Process-safe: continuous real-time diagnostics

    Process-safe: continuous real-time diagnostics

  • Rhythmisch: der pulsatorische Antrieb durch Umstülpung

    Rhythmic: the pulsatory drive by turning inside-out

  • Rhythmic: the pulsatory drive by turning inside-out

    Rhythmic: the pulsatory drive by turning inside-out

  • Rhythmic: the pulsatory drive by turning inside-out

    Rhythmic: the pulsatory drive by turning inside-out

Inversion kinematics: inspiration for new drive concepts

The shape of this flying object is based on the geometrical band devised by Paul Schatz: its middle section, in the form of an articulated ring of six members, detaches itself from a cube and constantly turns inside-out, taking on different geometrical shapes in the process.

With the geometrical band Schatz discovered that the principle of kinematics, which until then had been based on rotation and translation (linear motion), could be extended by a further mode: inversion. With SmartInversion, the engineers and designers are now investigating where and how geometrical inversion can be put to use in technology.